by Ada@

Hello, hello! I am back, ready to [ADA]Explore more and more! Are you ready?

Lovely Iceland during winter…This country of the fire and ice it is really deserve  her name, with her stunning  icy landscape  and fire from the ground, you  just  get in love of her;)!

Of course, you have the wind, that ruin all the traveling plans ( that happens to me a lot), but still remain the beautiful day and what you capture on pictures it is a small part of what yours eyes see….

I had my own road trip of the Golden Circle, the most popular tourist route in South Iceland, covering about 300 km looping from Reykjavík into central Iceland and back. It is the area that contains most tours and travel related activities in Iceland.

The three primary stops on the route are the National park Þingvellir, the waterfall Gullfoss (meaning “golden falls”), and the geothermally active valley of Haukadalur, which contains the geysers Geysir and Strokkur. Though Geysir has been inactive for a long time, Strokkur, on the other hand, continues to erupt at every 5–10 minutes interval.

I have to admit that waterfall Gullfoss, it was oauuuuuuuu, it is one of the most beautiful waterfall that I ever see. I just cant wait for the summer to visit again!!! So this is a must on your list visiting Iceland!

by Ada@

It is located in South Iceland on the Hvítá (White) river which is fed by Iceland´s second biggest glacier, the Langjökull. The water plummets down 32 meters in two stages into a rugged canyon which walls reach up to 70 meters in height. On a sunny day shimmering rainbow can be seen over the falls ( maybe in the summer time for me).

The Geysir and Strokkur have their one charm, because in a very cold winter day, that will be the place of the fire that you look for it:)! It is great to see the wonderful landscape.

by Ada@

Geysir lies in the Haukadalur valley on the slopes of Laugarfjall hill, which is also the home to Strokkur geyser about 50 metres south.

Eruptions at Geysir can hurl boiling water up to 70 metres in the air. However, eruptions may be infrequent, and have in the past stopped altogether for years at a time .The nearby geyser Strokkur erupts much more frequently than Geysir, erupting to heights of up to 30 metres every few minutes. Strokkur’s activity has also been affected by earthquakes, although to a lesser extent than the Great Geysir. Due to its eruption frequency, online photos and videos of Strokkur are regularly mislabelled as depicting Geysir. There are around thirty much smaller geysers and hot pools in the area, including one called Litli Geysir (‘Little Geysir’).

And the last stop was at the  National Parck Þingvellir was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site on cultural criteria. Maybe in the winter time it is not a great idea, because the days are short and the weather conditions changing so fast … Thats way we have to [ADA]Explore more in summer time the wonderful Island!

by Ada@

Great!!!! You do craving to travel and [ADA]Explore?!

 

 

 

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